Roast beef and port; venison and claret

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A pair of 1772 etchings by Matthew Darly (c.1720–1780) show how in 18th century England port was the wine of the middle-classes; claret was the wine of the landowning upper-classes.

Roast Beef & Port. or Bully Bramble Esqr Justice of Peace in Wasp Town” is described on the British Museum website as “Portrait, whole length, of a stout man facing three-quarter to right., looking to left over his right. shoulder. His left hand is thrust under his buttoned coat; his right (gloved) rests on a cane. He wears a looped hat, a tightly curled wig and is plainly dressed.”

Plainly-dressed men ate beef and drank port, whereas the figure in “Venison & Claret, or Sr. Humpy. Haunch” wears an extravagantly bright coat with silk stockings. Carrying a sword rather than a walking stick, he is clearly more affluent than “Bully Bramble”.

This type of gentleman ate venison and drank claret.

Stuart George | Founder and Managing Director

Arden Fine Wines

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